Don’t let Wy come to my funeral. She’s mentally ill’: Naomi Judd’s devastating suicide note

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Naomi Judd left behind a suicide note insisting that her daughter Wynonna was prohibited from attending her funeral, and claimed that she suffered from mental illness.

The Post-it note was found near the body of the 76-year-old woman after she shot herself to death at her Tennessee mansion in April.

It read: ‘Don’t let Wy come to my funeral. He has a mental illness. The word ‘no’ appears to have been underlined.

The note was among a series of documents released by the Williamson County Sheriff’s Department this week.

Wynnona attended the funeral, a source said. online radarand he believes the note was written when his mother was out of her mind.

Cops also shared images of the country music star’s bloodstained bedding, as well as a photograph of a gun on his nightstand.

Meanwhile, they released a series of notes written by an officer who attended the crime scene, saying Naomi had threatened to kill herself “half a dozen times.”

The Judds, daughters Wynonna, 58, Ashley, 54, and her husband Larry Strickland, tried to prevent the police report from being made public, but dropped the case in December.

Naomi Judd left a suicide note at her bedside, insisting that her daughter Wynonna should not attend her funeral.

Naomi Judd left a suicide note at her bedside, insisting that her daughter Wynonna should not attend her funeral.

Naomi Judd (right) is seen with her daughter Wynonna (left), in one of her last public appearances.  She is pictured waving to the crowd at the CMT Music Awards on April 11, 2022.

Naomi Judd (right) is seen with her daughter Wynonna (left), in one of her last public appearances. She is pictured waving to the crowd at the CMT Music Awards on April 11, 2022.

Sheriffs released photos of the scene where Judd took his own life

Sheriffs released photos of the scene where Judd took his own life

Shocking images from the scene showed the Post-it note attached to what appeared to be a magazine.

He also showed his large bed covered in blood that had stained his sheets and pillows after the tragedy.

Meanwhile, an officer’s notes shed more light on what happened on the day of her death, including conversations the cops had with the family.

Strickland, her husband of 33 years, was in Europe at the time of her death and the police report noted that she did not like being alone.

“I didn’t like being alone/Larry in Europe,” wrote a deputy sheriff, in a handwritten note from the scene.

“She threatened to kill herself half a dozen times, guns were involved. She locked herself in her bedroom. She would threaten to shoot people who took her away (illegible.)’

The police report also details how Ashley found her mother and comforted her as they waited 30 minutes for an ambulance to arrive at the Leipers Fork home, 25 miles south of downtown Nashville.

Ashley found her mother in a manic state and called the family doctor, Dr. Ted Klontz. The actress told police that her mother yelled, ‘Kill me, kill me now.’ I do not want to live!

She said she responded, “Now, Mom, you know I’m not going to do that.”

Ashley texted Klontz, writing: ‘He’s having an episode. Screaming, crying and pacing… Emergency… Please come to Mom’s… Now.’

When Klontz arrived, she told him, ‘I was yelling and speaking in tongues.’ Ashley said her mother calmed down when the doctor arrived and then left them alone to discuss her condition.

When he returned to the room, he found his mother with a gunshot wound to the head. She told the doctor: ‘She did it. She finally did it.

Country singer Naomi Judd left behind her two daughters, Wynonna and Ashley

Ashley Judd (left) with her mother Naomi Judd (center) and sister Wynonna Judd (right)

Naomi Judd's home in Tennessee, where she was found with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Naomi Judd’s home in Tennessee, where she was found with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

In a harrowing essay in The New York Times, Ashley in August described how finding out about her mother was “the most devastating day of my life.”

“The trauma of discovering and then holding her body in labor haunts me at night,” she wrote.

But instead of being able to comfort her mother in her final moments, Ashley said police officers harshly questioned her and took her away from her mother.

“I felt cornered and powerless as law enforcement officers began questioning me as the last of my mother’s life slipped away,” she wrote.

“I wanted to comfort her, telling her that she was about to see her dad and her little brother when she ‘went home,’ as we say in Appalachia.”

Ashley said she was so shocked after finding her dying mother that she answered questions from the police she didn’t want.

She said: ‘I would never have responded on any other day’ and never thought to consider whether the public would have access to it later.

“In the immediate aftermath of a life-changing tragedy, when we are in acute shock, trauma, panic, and anguish, the authorities show up to talk to us,” he wrote.

‘Because so many of us are socially conditioned to cooperate with law enforcement, we are completely off guard in what we say.

‘I never thought to ask my own questions, including: Is your body camera on? Are they recording me on audio again? Where and how will what I am sharing be stored, used and made available to the public?”

Larry Strickland pictured with Naomi Judd

According to the report, the shot that killed Judd “perforated the right side of the scalp and entered the skull through an entry-type gunshot wound.”

The country superstar died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in April 2022 at the age of 76.

The country superstar died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in April 2022 at the age of 76.

Ashley Judd (left) with her mother Naomi Judd (right).  Ashley and her family filed a petition to seal police records of interviews taken in the moments after Naomi's suicide last April.  The family abandoned their efforts in December.

Ashley Judd (left) with her mother Naomi Judd (right). Ashley and her family filed a petition to seal police records of interviews taken in the moments after Naomi’s suicide last April. The family abandoned their efforts in December.

Both Ashley and Wynonna were removed from their mother’s will, leaving Strickland to make decisions about their estate and assets.

The Judd family said in a statement confirming her death: “Our beloved mother and wife succumbed to mental illness.

“Everyone who has been through this tragedy understands that in the depths of a mental health crisis, thinking is profoundly distorted.

Furthermore, the worst days are never representative of the comforts and pleasures of days free from illness.

“After this tragedy, our family has tried to grieve, together, with our community, and most importantly, with the privacy that all who lose a family member deserve.

“We have always been a frank and open family about our difficulties and the depth of our love for each other.

“In this particular matter, however, we ask for privacy, because a death with privacy is a death with more dignity.”

The Judds were the most successful country singers of the ’80s, winning five Grammy Awards, nine CMA Awards, and selling 20 million records.

In the immediate aftermath of her mother’s death, Ashley and Wynonna supported each other in her loss, attending her induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame on May 1, the day after her mother’s suicide.

Naomi and Wynonna Judd pictured in their prime

Naomi and Wynonna Judd pictured in their prime

According to inside sources, Wynonna feels entitled to a

The Judds at the Country Music Awards in 1985

On May 29, a month after her mother’s death, Wynonna wrote an emotional post on Instagram in which she discussed her excruciating pain and her fear that she could never ‘give in to the truth’ the way her mother did. left this life

Naomi had a tumultuous upbringing, partly attributing her depression to the sexual abuse she suffered at the hands of an uncle when she was just three years old.

When she was 22, Naomi was raped and beaten by an ex-boyfriend, a trauma that led her to flee Los Angeles for rural Kentucky, where she lived with her children on welfare while preparing to become a nurse.

They lived in a house with no electricity, telephone, television, or indoor plumbing.

Naomi moved to Nashville when she graduated, eventually becoming head nurse in an intensive care unit.

It was there that he learned that a patient’s father was in the music industry. She made a tape of herself singing with Wynonna, gave it to him, and the music career of ‘The Judds’ was launched.

On May 29, a month after her mother’s death, Wynonna wrote an emotional post on Instagram in which she discussed her excruciating pain and her fear that she could never ‘give in to the truth’ the way her mother did. left this life

She wrote about ‘self-healing’, her feeling of being ‘helpless’ and how little she knew in the face of so much despair and drama.

She said she would continue to fight for her faith, herself and her family, to continue to ‘show up and sing’.

And he vowed to “break the cycle” of addiction and dysfunction that has plagued Judd women.

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